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Influenza

  • Influenza:
    • Commonly referred to as the Flu.
    • Respiratory tract infection caused by one of the influenza viruses.
    • 3 Different Influenza Viruses:
      • Type A (most common)
      • Type B (usually associated with milder symptoms)
      • Type C
    • Each type also has different subgroups or strains, so each year the influenza virus is slightly different and can infect people several times during their lifetime.
    • Usually strikes between December and early April.
    • Epidemics usually peak in January and February.
  • Influenza Prevention:
    • Best way to prevent influenza is by getting a Flu shot every October or November.
    • Flu shots are about 80% effective in preventing influenza.
    • Very few people have side effects.
    • About 1% to 2% have mild influenza-like symptoms in the 1st 24 hours after getting the vaccine.
    • Contrary to popular myth, you CANNOT get influenza from a Flu shot.
    • CDC recommends the Flu shot for the following people:
      • All persons age 65 or older
      • Household members (including children) of persons in high-risk groups (such as health care workers & employees of hospitals, medical offices, nursing homes, and chronic care facilities)
      • Children and adults who have chronic diseases of the heart, lungs, kidneys, diabetes, or any condition that weaken the immune system
      • Children and teens who are receiving long-term treatment with aspirin because they are at a higher risk for Reye's syndrome
      • Women who will be past the 1st trimester of pregnancy during the Flu season
    • Flu shots will begin to provide its protective effect 1 or 2 weeks after receiving the injection.
    • Immunity decreases usually after several months.
    • Flu shots will not protect all persons against influenza.
    • Flu shots will not protect against other illnesses that resemble influenza.
    • Dosage: only 1 Flu shot is needed each year for everyone 12 years and older.
    • Possible Side Effects:
      • most people have no side effects
      • Flu shots can be given by injection or nasal mist
      • injections are usually given in the muscle of the upper arm often causing fever and aches for 1-2 days
      • allergic response, more serious reactions, or even death can occur from the Flu shot
    • Warnings:
      • people with an allergy to eggs should not get the Flu shot
      • people with a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome should not get the Flu shot
      • women who are or might be pregnant should discuss the risks with their doctor
      • Flu shots should be delayed for illnesses with fever

Masks Required on Campus